Because of the diverse nature of the many different restaurants and chefs Brian Henry has worked under he is highly proficient at a wide range of cuisines.

Brian’s cooking is seasonal, inventive and smart, but in no way unapproachable or fussy. When he is coaxed out of the kitchen and starts talking about food, his passion and knowledge are instantly recognizable.

"Chef Brian Henry cooked a series of delicious appetizers for us as we sat around a table in the kitchen". Thanks

Tony Aspler, Wine writer

“Chef Brian Henry puts one hundred percent of his energy into going all the way.”

Birgit Moenke, Editor Stir Media Read More Reviews

Posts Tagged ‘Lakefield’

Gastronomically yours,

March 23rd, 2012

Something to Birch About

 

This winter or more specifically a lack of it has made for easier heating bills and a lot less shoveling but I can’t help but wonder what will happen to this year’s maple sap harvest. For those of you who weren’t aware Ontario maple syrup producers started harvesting this year’s crop three weeks ago.

 Making birch syrup is similar to making maple syrup but you need to be aware of some critical differences in the saps to be able to have a successful harvest. Birch sap harvesting begins right after the maple harvest ends as it requires warmer weather than the maple sap to flow. The birch sugaring season is shorter than maple and only lasts for about two weeks.

 Birch sap contains less than half the sugar found in maple sap. This translates to approximately 100 liters of birch sap being required to produce 1 liter of birch syrup opposed to the 40 liters of maple sap required to produce 1 liter of maple syrup. Also the sugars present in birch sap are fructose and glucose instead of sucrose found in maple sap. Fructose and glucose burn very easily which necessitates birch sap being processed below its boiling point so that its sugars do not burn. Comparatively birch sap is far more expensive to produce as it requires almost 4 times the amount of energy to render it into syrup. This explains why birch syrup costs $275.00 a gallon.

 Birch syrup is easier to digest than maple syrup and has significantly higher amounts of nutrients than maple syrup which is why it has been considered somewhat of an elixir or tonic throughout many cultures living in the extreme northerly regions of the northern hemisphere.

 If are thinking about harvesting birch sap for sugaring you will also need to consider that birch sap is notably more acidic than maple sap. For this reason you should only use plastic or stainless steel equipment to process birch syrup as aluminum and galvanized steel can be dissolved by the sap giving the finished syrup a metallic taste. Also look for Paper birch trees as they have the highest concentration of sugar than other species of birch trees.

  Before setting out in the woods or off to a specialty food store to get some birch syrup you need to be aware that even though birch syrup is used just like maple syrup to coat meats, vegetable and stacks of flapjacks; it’s taste is quite different as it’s sugars give it a roasted caramel flavor with somewhat spicy tones to it. Locally you can find birch trees almost anywhere to tap to make your own birch syrup and try it in the following recipe. Remember that 1 cup birch syrup reads: 100 cups birch sap,

 

 

Birch Syrup Pie

 

1 cup Birch Syrup

1 tsp. cornstarch
1/4 cup water
2 egg yolks, beaten lightly
2 tbsp. butter
1 8 inch pie shell- made and baked ahead of time

Method:

Gently heat the birch syrup over a low flame in a medium sized, stainless steel sauce pot. Separately whisk together the corn-starch and water until smooth, then whisk the cornstarch slurry into the syrup. Next whisk the egg yolks into the syrup. Continue stirring the syrup mixture while cooking it over low heat until it has thickened and the corn-starch is cooked out.

Remove the pot from the heat and whisk in the butter.  Pour the syrup mixture into the pre-cooked pie shell and allow it to cool down to room temperature. Serve warm with ice cream.

 

Kawartha International Wine & Food Festival

March 4th, 2012
 
 
Sunday, April 15, 2012
At The Venue, 286 George Street North,
Peterborough, Ontario

Noon until 8:00 p.m.
$12.00 per person (HST included)
Included 1 Food and Wine Pairing Wine Wheel (retail value $10.)
 
The Venue is proud to be hosting the first annual Kawartha International Wine & Food Festival… Sunday April 15th! Produced by Shari Darling and the Kawartha Entertainment Group, the festival promises to be a one of a kind event that will draw global wine, artisan local beer, spirit and food lovers from all over the Kawarthas and beyond.
 
The Kawartha International Wine & Food Festival’s goal is to put superb wines from around the globe alongside some of Peterborough’s finest fare…Global wine, local food is our mantra! While strolling around the Venue sampling from our incredible list of vendors, you’ll be able to stop and listen in on one of our product seminars which will run throughout the day. Or you may like to book yourself into one of our global cooking demos from local culinary masters Chef Brian Henry and Chef Brian Forsythe. Perhaps a trip up to our artisan micro brew and spirit section may be of interest? We’ll have it all under one roof! Each vendor will charge for samples.
 
This is a truly unique event for Peterborough and the surrounding area. No other event in the Kawarthas will bring such an amazing array or food and wine vendors together to tantalize your palette like the Kawartha International Wine & Food Festival.
 
 
 
Contact Shari Darling for details: shariLdarling@aol.com , (705) 957-0324
 
 

Gastronomically yours,

March 3rd, 2012

Bovine Milk

 

Humans began consuming the milk of other mammals around 9000 BC. It was at this time that we began domesticating animals which led to the agriculture revolution. Farming practices began in Southwest Asia and grew in commonality through nomadic cultures as it permitted people to move about the land taking their food sources with them instead of the more firmly rooted practice of crop farming.

 These nomadic people`s became wandering yet self-sustained micro-economies, who sold dairy and meat derived foods as well as livestock throughout the regions they traversed. At this time global diversity and trade progressed at a nomad’s pace taking almost 4000 years for the practice of dairy farming to reach Europe. After which globalization saw another 1500 years pass before milk harvesting reached the Americas.

 At first humans raised sheep and goats for milk production as these smaller creatures were easily cultivated in comparison to the domestication of bovine species as this required the taming of the now extinct auroch which would have been a dangerous feat as these mammals measured 5ft across at their withers which shouldered horns up to three feet in length each.  

 Although milk is most commonly collected from cows, sheep and goats there are cultures and economies that rely on milk harvested from camels, horses, reindeer, water buffalo, bison and yak.

 Today our planet produces in excess of 700 million tons of milk annually to supply the demands of our planets ever growing population. The bulk of this milk is derived from bovine sources of which India is the world’s largest producer of milk. The ever increasing demand for our global consumption of milk products has seen the growth has seen the advancement in automated milking equipment and investment by large conglomerate dairy companies around the world.

 Locally we can still savour the taste of smaller scale milk producers like The Kawartha Dairy Company who works cooperatively with smaller farms creating a diverse local economy and is celebrating its 75th year as a Canadian-family owned and operated business. I encourage you to buy some locally produced milk to add to this weeks following recipe.

 

Chunky Potato Soup

Ingredients

½ pound bacon, chopped

¼ cup celery, diced

1 cup cooking onion, diced

1 tsp. garlic, minced

4 cups of potatoes, cut into ½ inch and cubes

3 cups chicken stock

½ cup milk or heavy cream

½ tsp of dried thyme or tarragon

1 tbsp. parsley chopped fine

Salt and pepper to taste

Directions

In a heavy bottomed soup pot cook the bacon over medium heat until desired doneness. Remove the bacon from the pot and set aside. Sauté the celery and onions in the remaining bacon grease until they are tender but not browned. Add the garlic and potatoes to the pot and continue cooking for another 5 minutes while continuously stirring the mixture. Pour in the stock and simmer over medium-low heat until the potatoes are tender. Add the milk, and herbs to the soup. Puree half the soup to let the potato starch act as a natural thickening agent while the remaining potato pieces will allow for the soup to be chunky. Stir the cooked bacon into the soup. Season the soup with salt and pepper to taste and serve immediately. Serves 4.

 

Gastronomically yours,

March 2nd, 2012

 

Where the buffalo roam

 

We use the words buffalo and bison interchangeably as if they were describing the same animal but the two are actually distant relatives which are more closely related to the domesticated bovine than each other.

 Buffalo are related to the Asian water buffalo. Bison are the almost mythical creature that roamed North America with a population in excess of 50 million. Today those herds have dwindled down to around 13 000 animals that areconsidered to be truly genetic- wild-bison living in protected game preserves and park land.

 Commercially we can find half a million bison being raised for its meat and hides throughout North America. Annually we see about 10% of these animals being culled for human consumption. These cultivated animals are crossbreeds that contain bovine or beef cattle DNA and are referred to as beefalo by some.

 Wild bison have a lifespan of 15 years and may weigh up to 1,000 kg compared to commercially raised bison that may exceed 25 years of age and weigh in around 1600kg.

 At first glance bison meat is quite similar to beef. Nutritionally bison contains less than half the fats and cholesterol found in beef. Due to the healthier qualities associated with this densely flavored protein we have to make some adjustments in the kitchen when we prepare it. Bison is naturally tender however it is often misjudged as being tough this misconception is largely due to it being improperly cooked. The main thing to consider when cooking bison is that it is extremely lean and will cook very quickly compared to other meats. It responds best to being cooked slowly using lower temperatures. It is critical that buffalo meat does not get over cooked; simply this meat should not be cooked beyond medium rare. 

 Locally Tim Belch operates a bison farm that supplies restaurants throughout Ontario and is sold to the public from their farm and at Peterborough’s Saturday Farmers Market. At one time Belch’s Bison farm was the largest producer of bison in Canada.

 I recommend trying some of Belch’s Bison as a healthy alternative to other proteins you may currently use in your diet keeping in mind the preparation tips previously suggested or simply try this week’s recipe for a southwestern flavored roast.

 

Southwest style Bison Tenderloin

1 center cut bison tenderloin approximately 2 lbs.

1 tablespoon canola oil

1 ½ tsp. ancho chile powder  

1 tsp. ground cumin

1 tsp. brown sugar

 

1/2 tsp. dried oregano

1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

2 cloves garlic minced

2 cloves garlic minced

1/4 tsp. celery seeds

2 tbsp. fresh lime juice

 

Method:  In a medium size bowl whisk together the oil, herbs, spices and lime juice. Completely coat the bison loin with the oil mixture and let it stand at room temperature for 45 minutes. Preheat your oven to 425°f and then cook your tenderloin on a wire rack in a roasting pan for 25-30 minutes or until it reaches an internal temperature 130°f. Remove the roast from the oven and let it stand for 10 minutes prior to slicing and serving it. Serves 4 people.

 

 

 

Gastronomically yours,

March 2nd, 2012

Something to Birch About

 

This winter or more specifically a lack of it has made for easier heating bills and a lot less shoveling but I can’t help but wonder what will happen to this year’s maple sap harvest. For those of you who weren’t aware Ontario maple syrup producers started harvesting this year’s crop three weeks ago.

 Making birch syrup is similar to making maple syrup but you need to be aware of some critical differences in the saps to be able to have a successful harvest. Birch sap harvesting begins right after the maple harvest ends as it requires warmer weather than the maple sap to flow. The birch sugaring season is shorter than maple and only lasts for about two weeks.

 Birch sap contains less than half the sugar found in maple sap. This translates to approximately 100 liters of birch sap being required to produce 1 liter of birch syrup opposed to the 40 liters of maple sap required to produce 1 liter of maple syrup. Also the sugars present in birch sap are fructose and glucose instead of sucrose found in maple sap. Fructose and glucose burn very easily which necessitates birch sap being processed below its boiling point so that its sugars do not burn. Comparatively birch sap is far more expensive to produce as it requires almost 4 times the amount of energy to render it into syrup. This explains why birch syrup costs $275.00 a gallon.

 Birch syrup is easier to digest than maple syrup and has significantly higher amounts of nutrients than maple syrup which is why it has been considered somewhat of an elixir or tonic throughout many cultures living in the extreme northerly regions of the northern hemisphere.

 If are thinking about harvesting birch sap for sugaring you will also need to consider that birch sap is notably more acidic than maple sap. For this reason you should only use plastic or stainless steel equipment to process birch syrup as aluminum and galvanized steel can be dissolved by the sap giving the finished syrup a metallic taste. Also look for Paper birch trees as they have the highest concentration of sugar than other species of birch trees.

  Before setting out in the woods or off to a specialty food store to get some birch syrup you need to be aware that even though birch syrup is used just like maple syrup to coat meats, vegetable and stacks of flapjacks; it’s taste is quite different as it’s sugars give it a roasted caramel flavor with somewhat spicy tones to it. Locally you can find birch trees almost anywhere to tap to make your own birch syrup and try it in the following recipe. Remember that 1 cup birch syrup reads: 100 cups birch sap,

 

 

Birch Syrup Pie

 

1 cup Birch Syrup

1 tsp. cornstarch
1/4 cup water
2 egg yolks, beaten lightly
2 tbsp. butter
1 8 inch pie shell- made and baked ahead of time

Method:

Gently heat the birch syrup over a low flame in a medium sized, stainless steel sauce pot. Separately whisk together the corn-starch and water until smooth, then whisk the cornstarch slurry into the syrup. Next whisk the egg yolks into the syrup. Continue stirring the syrup mixture while cooking it over low heat until it has thickened and the corn-starch is cooked out.

Remove the pot from the heat and whisk in the butter.  Pour the syrup mixture into the pre-cooked pie shell and allow it to cool down to room temperature. Serve warm with ice cream.

 

Gastronomically yours,

March 2nd, 2012

Gastronomically yours,

February 10th, 2012

Horseradish

 

Horseradish is an herbaceous perennial that is related to turnips, cabbage and mustard. The entire plant is reputed to have medicinal properties and has been used in the treatment of urinary tract infections, rheumatism, and joint pain. It was commonly prescribed for bronchial, lung and throat ailments which explain why horseradish may once have been known as hoarse-radish. Its medicinal and culinary uses have been documented since the Middle Ages throughout Asia, Egypt and the Roman Empire. Today horseradish is being studied for its cancer fighting properties.

 In the kitchen we consume the horseradish roots which look somewhat like a cross between a dishevelled parsnip and a lumpy piece of ginger with a light tanned skin and white center.  The roots are harvested in the fall by cutting them from the plant. Due to Ontario’s growing season horseradish producers only harvest about half of their crop as the rest is left behind to grow the next generation of to be harvested as our climate does not allow for it to be propagated from seed. Due to this method of harvesting it is believed that Ontario grown horseradish could potentially be the same plant being harvested generation after generation with a possible genealogy that is centuries old.

 Horseradish was chosen as 2011’s Herb of the Year which means we will see a spike in its use and availability. Ontario grown horseradish is commonly found innocently lounging in the produce section at this time of year. It will have no smell as its fiery personality lies dormant until the root is bruised by chopping, grating or grinding it in the kitchen which will cause it to release its potency. Its tenacity can only be controlled by vinegar which stabilizes the roots volatile oils and sulphuric compounds. The longer that one waits to add the freshly ground horseradish to a vinegar solution the hotter the horseradish becomes.

 Making your own horseradish style condiment at home is easy to do but can be a tearful experience. You may want to wear gloves and goggles for the fiery tasks that lie ahead. If nothing more at least open some windows to help air out your sinuses. You can find fresh Ontario horseradish root in the produce section of your local grocery store. I recommend selecting smaller roots to work with as they are less fibrous making them easier to work with. Once completed the following recipe will provide you with a delicious condiment that just might cure whatever ails you at this time of year. Personally I enjoy my horseradish stirred into the classic Canadian invented drink; the Caesar.

 

Home-style Horseradish

Ingredients:

1 cup peeled and coarsely chopped horseradish root

1/2 cup white vinegar

1 tbsp. white sugar

1/4 teaspoon salt

Method:

Use a vegetable peeler to peel the roots as you would peel a carrot. Chop the peeled root into pieces. Combine all of the ingredients in a food processor and grind the ingredients into a smooth consistent paste. Once completed allow the mixture to rest with the lid on for a couple of minutes. Cautiously remove the lid off of the food processor, keeping your face away from the container. Store the horseradish in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 3 weeks.

 

Gastronomically yours,

January 15th, 2012

Chocolate Duck

Pekinduck is a breed of duck bred from the Mallard duck inChina. Its domestication was primarily for egg and meat production. In 1873 nine Pekins were exported toLong Island,New Yorkwhich explains why some refer to this breed asLong Islandduck. Since this time thePekinduck has become the most consumed commercially available source of duck meat.

 Peking Duck is a method of cooking duck which similar to thePekinbreed has its origins inChina. This Imperial era dish originated during the Yuan Dynasty and was further developed and refined during the Ming Dynasty. The preparation of this dish focuses its attention on the crisp air injected skin preparation of the duck that is coated with seasoned honey and Hoisin sauce.

 I’ve chosen to prepare myPekinduck in one ofMexico’s seven secret sauces known as Mole (moh-lay) that I learned about while travelling inMexico. I like to use a brown Mole with duck as it quite rich and combining duck and chocolate into the same recipe is guaranteed to delight the palate. I sourced my duck from Beavermeadow farms on the Hendson Line. This certified organic farm raises free range pastured chicken, turkey andPekinducks with all products sold from the Farmgate.

 

Southwest Mole Marinated Duck

 

Two tomatillos husks removed and roasted (optional)

One half cup toasted sesame seeds

One half cup vegetable oil

Twelve dried Ancho chillies, stemmed, seeded and chopped

Four cloves garlic

Two thirds cup pine nuts

Two thirds cup chopped dried apricots

Three cups chicken stock

One half tsp. cinnamon

One quarter tsp. ground pepper

One eighth tsp. ground cloves

Two oz bitter sweet chocolate chopped

One tsp bread crumbs

One eighth tsp. cardamom

One half cup sugar

Six boneless duck breast

Use a spoon to scoop the pulp and juice from the tomatillos into a medium sized stock pot.  Discard the skins. Add the sesame seeds to the tomatillos. In a separate pot over medium heat, heat the oil. Using a slotted spoon cook the Ancho’s in the oil until lightened in color. Transfer the Ancho’s to the tomatillo mixture. Cook the garlic and pine nuts in the oil until golden brown and add to the tomatillo pot. Remove the oil from the heat and let it cool for safe disposal.  Add all remaining ingredients to the tomatillo sauce mixture excluding the duck. Cook the sauce over medium heat for half an hour. Using an immersion blender puree the sauce until sooth and continue cooking it over low heat for another one to two hours until reduce to a thick paste. Remove sauce from heat and allow it to cool to room temperature.

 Once cooled marinate the duck breasts in the mole for twelve hours covered in the refrigerator. Remove the duck from the marinade and place fat side up onto a baking sheet. Roast the duck at 350°f for seven minutes for medium doneness. Remove duck from oven and cut into slices for serving fanned out onto plates. Drizzle the duck with chocolate sauce. Serve with a medley of julienne vegetable.

 

 

Polar Fest 2012 Ice Sculpting Competition Invitation

January 6th, 2012

TheLakefieldVillageMerchants 

Present the 8th Annual Polar Fest Ice Sculpting Competition

Greetings from the Kawarthas!

The Lakefield Village Merchants are currently planning the

8th Annual Polar Fest Ice Sculpting Competition

Saturday, February 4th, 2012

2012 theme

Mardi Gras”

 

Last year we had 16 competitors as well as an amateur area for kids and adults.

Each sculptor(s) or team will have 2-3 blocks of ice to work with.

In addition to prizes/awards for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners, all carvers will be given $100.00 to help offset incurred personal costs. The People’s Choice Award will be given at 5:00 pm, with an Ice Carvers’ Reception from 4:30 pm –5:30 pm immediately following the competition Saturday evening at The Thirsty Loon Pub.

 Please keep in mind that entrant space is limited and it fills quickly. Please respond by, January 31st, 2012. If you are interested please reply to me ASAP, and I will forward more information to you.

 Don’t hesitate to call or send me e-mail if you require any additional information. If you know of any other carvers who may be interested in participating, please let me know and I will gladly forward them an application form.

 I look forward to another successful year.

 Sincere regards,

 

Brian Henry

Private Chef Services

Ice Sculpting Competition Founding Facilitator

Lakefield Village Merchants

 

                         

 

Ice Sculpture Competition Guidelines

 

The following guidelines will assist you with your plans to participate in the upcoming Polar Fest Ice Sculpture Competition on Saturday, February 4, 2012.

PLEASE READ THESE CAREFULLY.

1     A minimum of two blocks of ice per entry will be supplied by The Lakefield Village Merchants (40”x 20” x 9.5” – approx. 300 lbs per ice block).

 2.     Ice carving will take place on Saturday, February 5, 2012 from 9 am to 4 pm. Please arrive at Cenotaph Park in Lakefield at 8 am for instructions for the day. The Awards Presentation will take place on Saturday at 4:00 pm with a reception from 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm immediately following the competition.

 3     Participants are responsible for supplying their own tools and materials – electricity will be provided. Neither ladders nor chairs are provided and it is the sculptor’s responsibility to provide these if necessary for their carvings. Please remember to bring extension cord(s) if you will be using chainsaws or other tools that require power. A limited number of generators will be on hand. You may choose to bring your own generators.

 4     The sculptures will remain on display for the whole weekend and as long the weather allows them to last. Once completed, all sculptures become the property of The Lakefield Village Merchants. The Lakefield Village Merchants retain exclusive rights to the sculptures and the use of any photographs, videos or reproductions thereof for future promotional, commercial or other applications. Parties interested in the use of photographs, videos or reproductions of the sculptures for commercial, promotional or other use application means must receive written approval of that use from Brian Henry, Competition Facilitator and from the Lakefield Village Merchants. Carvers shall be entitled to use photographs of the sculptures they themselves created for their personal portfolios and such use shall be excluded from this restriction.

 5        Safety is very important. In order to ensure the safety of all participants, we strongly recommend that personal protective equipment be used in order to avoid injuries due to the use of electrical or manual equipment. This includes safety boots, hearing protection, protective eyewear and other relevant safety equipment. Each participant is responsible for their own safety, as well as the safety of other competitors and the general public. The Township of Smith-Ennismore-Lakefield, the owners of property on which sculptures will be situated and The Lakefield Village Merchants will in no way be held responsible for injuries and/or damages incurred to the carvers/sculptors and their support team. The carvers are responsible for their tools and equipment. No rewards will be paid out due to loss, theft or damage to tools, equipment and personal effects.

 6        Other than the annually set theme there are no set parameters as to design to the sculptures, a general sense of taste must apply, with a liberal approach to keeping the sculptures in the realms of political correctness. As well this approach applies to the sculptor’s behavior and actions while partaking in this event.

 

Deadline for entry is January 31st, 2012.

        

2012 theme

Mardi Gras”

 

2012 Ice Sculpture Competition Entry Form

 

Name:                                                                                                                                    

 

Number of blocks requested: One              Two                 Three                    .

 

Telephone:                                                    Occupation:                                                  

 

Address:                                                                                                                               

 

City:                                                                            Postal Code:                         

 

E-mail:                                                                                                                                   

 

Please be sure to include (checklist below):

1      Completed form

2      Sculpture Design Plans

3      Short 100 word bio about yourself and or your team for press release.

  Please forward your completed entry form to:

Brian Henry

Private Chef Services

Ice Sculpting Competition Founding Facilitator

On behalf of the

LakefieldVillageMerchants

705. 875.0428

thechef@chefbrianhenry.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gastronomically Yours,

December 31st, 2011

Veisalgia for breakfast again?

 

Happy New Year!!

Ah yes you wake up and it’s 2012!  However with all of the fun and festivities you find yourself afraid to move. You slowly open your eyes. So far so good, so you continue on your way by pulling back the covers and getting out of bed.  You stand up and suddenly you feel like you’ve been struck by a bolt of lightening. Wave after wave of nausea come crashing in. You sit back down or fall down on the bed and lower your head. You can feel your pulse inside your skull. Your cold but you begin to sweat. Suddenly you dash off to the lou, take a seat and grab a bucket. You may begin to pray, begging forgivness or asking to meet your maker right then and there.

A hangover is the pain and greif that we suffer after an evening of debauchery. The symptoms vary but range from a dull headache to erratic body motor function. The multiple casualties caused by over-consumption of alcohol on are body are somewhat scietific in nature. It impairs the liver from producing glucose. Glucose is food for our brain. Ethanol consumed in your favourite cocktails acts as a diuretic, which lead to dehydration, causing our brains to shrink. Over consumption of ethanol can lead to a Vitamin B12 deficiancy also effecting brain function.  Fuesel oil also known as congeners are a by-product produced in fermented alcohols which can exaggerate the effects of a hangover. Congeners are often added to sweetend liquers in the form of zinc or other metals. These are rarley found in distilled spirits but are rampant in wine, especially red wines.

I’ve heard many a remedy for easing a hangover. Whatever you do, do not consume anything that contains acetominaphin (asprin) as this will thin your blood more than the alcohol already has, and caffienne will only dehydrate you further. The one that works best for me is to get up and get moving and push your way through the day with the same fierceness that got me here in the first place.

While helping me celebrate my wedding my long time friend and sous-chef Devin Peterson turned me on to drinking Pedialyte® the morning after a night of play. Pedialyte is formulated to quickly replace lost fluids with a balance of electrolytes. A litre of Pedialyte and some cold leftover- greasy- take-out that we squirreled away the night before quickly got us back on our feet.

A review in British Medical Journal on hangover cures by Max Pittler of thePeninsulaMedicalSchoolatExeterUniversityand colleagues concludes: “No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any conventional or complementary intervention is effective for preventing or treating alcohol hangover. The most effective way to avoid the symptoms of alcohol induced hangover is to practise moderation.”

 

Veisalgia for breakfast

 

1 litre of Pedialyte

One – two cups leftovers of your favourite comfort food

One big comfy couch

Lay back, relax and start rehydrating yourself as only this and the passing of time will get you back on your feet. Keep the remote and the phone close by just in case you need them.