Because of the diverse nature of the many different restaurants and chefs Brian Henry has worked under he is highly proficient at a wide range of cuisines.

Brian’s cooking is seasonal, inventive and smart, but in no way unapproachable or fussy. When he is coaxed out of the kitchen and starts talking about food, his passion and knowledge are instantly recognizable.

"Chef Brian Henry cooked a series of delicious appetizers for us as we sat around a table in the kitchen". Thanks

Tony Aspler, Wine writer

“Chef Brian Henry puts one hundred percent of his energy into going all the way.”

Birgit Moenke, Editor Stir Media Read More Reviews

Gastronomically yours,

Be a Corn Star

Maize known as corn in some countries is botanically classified as a caryopsis or dry fruit more popularly known as grain. Maize is indigenous to the Americas with some archaeological findings of corn and its associated ground meal has been carbon dated back about 7,000 years.

The Sweet corn that most of us look for at this time of year for corn on the cob is a variety of maize with high sugar content. Unlike field corn, which is harvested when the kernels are dry and fully mature, sweet corn is picked when immature and eaten as a vegetable, rather than a grain. Since the process of maturation involves converting sugar into starch, sweet corn stores poorly and must be eaten, canned, or frozen before the kernels convert the sugar into starch making them tough and overly starchy to our palates.

When I see a field of corn I think of corn on the cob, frozen nibblets, corn starch and popcorn.  I often forget to consider that the average grocery store carries almost 10 000 products of which one third consist of corn or a corn by-product. Most of the 300 million metric tonnes of corn harvested in North America this year will be converted into high fructose corn syrup which will be used in the production of pop, candy and processed foods.  Additionally to its applications for food production corn will be used in the production of antibiotics, aspirin, fuel, windshield washer fluid, spark plugs, tires, batteries, cosmetics, latex paint, disposable diapers, chalk, carpeting, fibreglass insulation and shaving cream to name  a few as well as the cardboard boxes used to ship all of these product in. Rather amazing that an ear of corn that always has an even number of rows of kernels on every cob and contain 200 to 400 kernels on average can be used in so many products.

Fresh local corn is something that most of us wait eagerly for and is easy to serve in so many ways. By adding corn kernels to any meal will add to its hardiness and increase its nutritional profile. Adding corn kernels and diced tomatoes to your guacamole will increase its flavour and enhance its texture Add a handful of corn to soups, sauces, chilli or chowders as well. You can also try a chilled salad with an Incan influence by combining cooked corn kernels, quinoa, tomatoes, sweet peppers and red kidney beans.

Traditionally we enjoy corn on the cob with a side order of butter and excessive serving of salt. For other simple yet healthy alternatives for seasoning your corn I recommend you try brushing your corn with olive or flaxseed oils and top it with any seasonings you enjoy.

The following is a list of some personal favourite flavour combinations to stir into your butter or oil to be applied to corn.

Mediterranean- Mince together oil packed sundried tomatoes, basil and garlic.

New Orleans- stir in some Cajun seasoning or a little Tabasco sauce.

Asian Style- Combine some wasabi with thinly sliced scallions.

Italian- Stir together some chopped capers, roasted red peppers, minced garlic and basil.

Pesto- A blend of basil, garlic and grated parmesan cheese.

Curried- curry paste and cilantro

Savoury- rosemary, thyme or poultry seasoning

 

 

Well Fork Me!

Well Fork Me!

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